Weekly News Letter Archive

To access the searchable archive of ICCA’s weekly news letters dating back to May 2011 click the banner below.

Archived News Postings

 

Line Break

ICCA – Ontario Chapter Launch a Great Success!

 

ICCA Ontario Launch Day Highlights - March 2018

Line Break

 

Dear colleagues,  

Please sign-up here as a partner for Second Chance Month this April. Second Chance Month is an initiative involving a growing coalition of over 80 partners to help raise awareness about the challenges people face when they return home and promote ways we can all unlock second chances.

We welcome all different types of entities to join us in celebrating (organizations, businesses, churches, temples, universities, etc.) and you do not have to make a big commitment to do so – promoting April as Second Chance Month via social media is an easy and impactful way to spread the word. We even have a handy social media toolkit you can use.

Read More

 

Line Break

 

“How Valuable is it to be a Canadian Member of ICCA – Let me tell ya!”

I am writing to share with the ICCA Members how valuable it is to be a Canadian Member of ICCA. Our Organization, Stonehenge Therapeutic Community in Guelph Ontario, Canada, continues to benefit.

Last year when attending the Community Corrections Public Policy Forum & Hill Day in Washington DC, I had the pleasure of being a guest at the CARA Reception. At the CARA Awards, Anchor ED was a recipient of the 2017 Pillar of Excellence Award. I was introduced to the Anchor ED Executive Director who shared their innovative program concept and more about the incredible impact they were making reducing the Opioid overdoses in their community. I immediately recognized the positive impacts a program such as this could have in Ontario Canada.

When I returned I presented the concept several times to funders in Ontario. In November Stonehenge received ongoing funding for the program from the Local Integration Health Network (funder for the Ministry of Health) . Our organization will launch the first stage of the Peer Led Overdose Response Program at Cambridge Memorial Hospital in May with the plan of a staged launch in our other 3 hospitals in the Region.

I was interviewed by CBC radio in regard to the program and put out a great “shout out” to ICCA.

Have a listen by opening the following link: http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/1130158147701

Thank you ICCA!

Image of Heather KerrHeather Kerr, MSW, RSW
Executive Director
Stonehenge Therapeutic Community
www.stonehengetc.com

Stone Henge Logo
“Giving People Another Chance At Life”

 

New Report: America needs to reconsider its approach to violent crime to reduce incarceration

As the nation struggles with how to address one of the greatest public policy issues in its history, a report, released today by the Justice Policy Institute (JPI), takes a new look at the issue of mass incarceration and how America responds to violent crime. The report, Defining Violence: Reducing Incarceration by Rethinking America’s Approach to Violence, notes that while there is currently more support than ever for criminal justice reform and efforts to reduce the imprisonment of more than 2 million people across the country, the U.S. will not be able to lower its incarceration rate significantly without changing how the justice system treats violent crimes.

The conversations on the federal and state levels, as well as recent policy reforms, have focused on reducing the incarceration of people convicted of nonviolent offenses. Yet just under half the people in prison have been convicted of a violent crime, and meaningful justice reform must include rethinking how laws, policies, and practices treat these offenses if the nation is to see sustained reductions in incarceration.

“This is a complicated political and systems reform issues, which many policymakers haven’t even yet begun to grapple with,” said Marc Schindler, Executive Director of the Justice Policy Institute. “There’s no question that we can safely and meaningfully reduce our prison and jail populations, but to do so we need to have the courage to come up with a more effective approach to violence prevention, and address how the justice system treats violent offenses.”

“The efforts to effectively reduce our country’s overreliance on incarceration can only be truly impactful if we include people convicted of violent offenses as part of these reforms. I know from experience running corrections systems, and the research bears this out, that many people convicted of a violent offense are actually less likely to reoffend than some others,” said George Lombardi, Director, Missouri Department of Corrections. “Bottom line, people need to be looked at individually and assessed on their cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes while incarcerated, not only on the crime they committed, in determining whether they are appropriate for return to the community. We need to be making investments in things we know will work to keep people from a life of crime in the first place, including early childhood education, responding to childhood trauma, and effective community-based mental health services.”

JPI is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to reducing the use of incarceration and the justice system by promoting fair and effective policies. The report Defining Violence and summaries of the major findings from the report are available on JPI’s website on August 23rd.


An Opinion Survey of the Community Corrections Collaborative Network: Where the Community Corrections Field Is Going and What It Needs to Get There

In 2014, a network of membership associations that represent community corrections practitioners—the Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN)—surveyed their memberships to gauge opinions about the state of the field. The survey sought to identify what community corrections practitioners believe are the significant issues and opportunities facing the field. CCCN’s goal with the survey is to bring a fresh perspective about where the field needs to go and what community corrections will need to get there, and allow those engaged in the national criminal justice reform debate to hear directly from those working with most people under correctional control. This survey is the first to ask those employed in community corrections their opinions about the field’s priorities. As such, the survey focuses on issues that relate to the direction community corrections is taking, the influence policymakers and the public have in determining that direction, and the resources needed to address new and anticipated priorities. The survey also provided CCCN an opportunity to determine if it is working on policy and issue areas that association memberships consider priorities Results show that the field embraces key elements of the new approach CCCN says the field needs to take: Key benchmarks include increasing reliance on evidence-based practices, research and data driven approaches. The survey results show strong support for a field that prioritizes innovation, systems change, collaboration and training.

View the survey here.


An Interview with Alex Tomaszczuk the Winner of Our 2015 Charlie Flowers Award

Alex Tomaszczuk the winner of ICCA’s Charlie Flowers Award for 2015 recently sat down for an interview with a representative of ICCA, Dr. Kevin Downey. Alex is a partner at Pillsbury Law Firm who we’d also like to thank for their ongoing hosting of the annual DC Forum board meeting. The following is an excerpt from their conversation.

How did you get introduced to ICCA?

I was first introduced to ICCA by the President of Dismas Charities, Inc., Mr. Ray Weis, and its CEO, Ms. Jan Kempf. That introduction was, in turn, facilitated by one of the current members of Dismas’s Board of Directors, who previously worked for Shaw, Pittman, one of the predecessor firms to Pillsbury (and where I started my legal career in 1982). Since that initial introduction I have had the pleasure of representing various organizations who participate in ICCA, including a few organizations that are represented on ICCA’s Board. This work goes back a decade or more — time flies when you’re having fun! I have always been impressed by the significant societal contributions made by ICCA and its member organizations.

For what kind of issues might our association members turn to the Pillsbury Law firm?

Pillsbury is one of the largest 100 law firms in the United States, with major offices in Washington, D.C., New York, Houston, throughout California, and in several international cities. We try to help our clients – which range from the largest corporations in the world to individuals – solve business problems efficiently and effectively. Having made that plug, there are several key areas where ICCA members might have occasion to call on us. First, if there is a dispute with or challenge to the actions of any governmental body, such as the U.S. Federal Bureau of Prisons, including the award of a contract or a failure to award a contract, or a dispute concerning the administration of a contract, we are well-positioned to assist with that effort (this happens to be the work I do as a government contracts litigator). Second, we have a highly-regarded non-profit organizations practice, based in Washington, D.C., which provides advice on tax, Board governance, and leadership transition issues. Third, we have a large litigation practice, a component of which focuses on employment claims and personnel disputes. Another component of our litigation practice is focused on the conduct of internal investigations and responding to Government subpoenas and investigations. We hope ICCA members never have to resolve an employment dispute with a disgruntled employee or respond to a Government investigation, but if that happens we can help. My direct dial phone number is 213-488-7110 (I always try to answer my own phone).

What is your experience in the community corrections field?

By and large, my “formal” experience in community corrections has been derived from working with clients that provide halfway house and other types of rehabilitative services. I have had occasion to visit several different facilities operated by clients, and that has always proven to be an enlightening and informative experience. During a post-college fellowship I had the opportunity to study rising incarceration rates and actually tour the federal prison at Leavenworth. On a “pro bono” basis my firm has also represented incarcerated individuals, including one notable death row case. Those experiences explain the great respect I have for the work that ICCA and its members perform on a daily basis.


Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — It was the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the drug busts were almost nightly.

The city of Columbus, and the nation, plagued by crack cocaine and laws were stiffened to try to stop it.

Now, 6,000 of those people rounded up in the raids are being released from prison early.

They have spent decades in prison.In recent years, legislators and judges have wondered if keeping them locked up is the right thing to do.

This weekend, thousands are being released to halfway houses to go through the process of job training, dealing with addictions, and everything else that comes with a reintroduction.

There are 99 here in Ohio, and some have already made the move.

“We’re talking about low-level, nonviolent drug offenders,” said Phil Nunes with Alvis, a series of halfway houses and reintroduction facilities throughout the state.

“Back in the 80s and 90s when crack cocaine was so prevalent, the federal government stepped in. (They took) what would ordinarily be an actual state statue and created a federal legislation statute, so now crack cocaine became not just a state offense it now became a federal offense.”

That’s why so many of them received stiff sentences.

Letting them out early, if there is no violence in their history, is a way to save money. But Nunes says it’s something more.

“It’s saving us money as well as getting those people out of an expensive prison bed, but it’s also saving human potential because these people can get a chance at getting a restart in their life.”

Of course, the drug convictions of the crack era aren’t the only offenders.

The average sentence reduction for those who’ve applied for retroactive sentencing since the amendment is 23 months, lowering the average sentence from 131 months to 108 months, the Justice Department said.

Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates said they were “modest reductions” for drug offenders, who will have served “substantial prison sentences.”

“The Department of Justice strongly supports sentencing reform for low-level, non-violent drug offenders,” she said in a statement. “The Sentencing Commission’s actions — which create modest reductions for drug offenders — is a step toward these necessary reforms.”

Source: Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio


Government of Canada Announces College Research Funding / New research projects will contribute to stronger, safer, healthier Canadian communities

TORONTO, ONTARIO — (Marketwired) — 01/21/16 — Colleges and polytechnics across Canada are receiving nearly $6 million in federal support through the Community and College Social Innovation Fund (CCSIF) to address a range of social issues, including poverty, community safety and local economic development.

Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan today announced funding for 27 research projects, alongside James Maloney, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke – Lakeshore.

Today’s event featured the project of Humber College’s Jeanine Webber. Her two-year impact study is receiving nearly $200,000 to examine the Toronto Police Service’s Neighbourhood Officer Program-which assigned neighbourhood officers to 17 selected neighbourhoods to increase police presence and address community problems. Dr. Webber and her team will partner with the Toronto Police Service as part of the study, which promotes public confidence through the scientific evaluation of a police program, while also engaging a greater number of community residents in the evaluation process.Government of Canada Announces College Research Funding / New research projects will contribute to stronger, safer, healthier Canadian communities

TORONTO, ONTARIO — (Marketwired) — 01/21/16 — Colleges and polytechnics across Canada are receiving nearly $6 million in federal support through the Community and College Social Innovation Fund (CCSIF) to address a range of social issues, including poverty, community safety and local economic development.

Minister of Science Kirsty Duncan today announced funding for 27 research projects, alongside James Maloney, Member of Parliament for Etobicoke – Lakeshore.

Today’s event featured the project of Humber College’s Jeanine Webber. Her two-year impact study is receiving nearly $200,000 to examine the Toronto Police Service’s Neighbourhood Officer Program-which assigned neighbourhood officers to 17 selected neighbourhoods to increase police presence and address community problems. Dr. Webber and her team will partner with the Toronto Police Service as part of the study, which promotes public confidence through the scientific evaluation of a police program, while also engaging a greater number of community residents in the evaluation process.

Read more…


ICCA’s 2016 Annual Conference will be held in Toronto, Canada and what a coincidence The New York Times voted it #7 out of 52 places to visit in 2016! Now you really gotta go!

Canada’s largest city is ready for its close-up.

Toronto is remaking itself as Canada’s premier city, quietly slipping out of the shadow of Montreal and Vancouver. Last year, the Queens Quay on Lake Ontario reopened, part of the largest continuing urban revitalization project in North America. It now has bike and pedestrian paths and new streetcars that link green spaces and promenades that will be full of public art. The Junction, a former industrial area, has emerged as Toronto’s most stylish neighborhood for its bars, live music and coffee shops. And the city is becoming easier to visit: a train now whisks travelers downtown from the airport in 25 minutes, and Air Canada offers extended stopovers for connecting passengers. Toronto has long been known for its cultural diversity and continues to draw major artistic and sporting events, including the Toronto International Film Festival each September, and the 2016 N.B.A. All-Star game, held outside the United States for the first time.

More Here: //www.nytimes.com/interactive/2016/01/07/travel/places-to-visit.html?place=toronto


A TV news article with ICCA Past President Phil Nunes

Watch it here

Some federal prisoners being released early this weekend, including in Ohio

By Mike Bowersock

5Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)5 Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) 131Share on Facebook (Opens in new window)131 Click to share on Pinterest (Opens in new window)

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WCMH) — It was the late 1980s and early 1990s, and the drug busts were almost nightly.

The city of Columbus, and the nation, plagued by crack cocaine and laws were stiffened to try to stop it.

Now, 6,000 of those people rounded up in the raids are being released from prison early.

They have spent decades in prison.

In recent years, legislators and judges have wondered if keeping them locked up is the right thing to do.

This weekend, thousands are being released to halfway houses to go through the process of job training, dealing with addictions, and everything else that comes with a reintroduction.

There are 99 here in Ohio, and some have already made the move.

“We’re talking about low-level, nonviolent drug offenders,” said Phil Nunes with Alvis, a series of halfway houses and reintroduction facilities throughout the state.

“Back in the 80s and 90s when crack cocaine was so prevalent, the federal government stepped in. (They took) what would ordinarily be an actual state statue and created a federal legislation statute, so now crack cocaine became not just a state offense it now became a federal offense.”

That’s why so many of them received stiff sentences.

Letting them out early, if there is no violence in their history, is a way to save money. But Nunes says it’s something more.

“It’s saving us money as well as getting those people out of an expensive prison bed, but it’s also saving human potential because these people can get a chance at getting a restart in their life.”

Of course, the drug convictions of the crack era aren’t the only offenders.

The average sentence reduction for those who’ve applied for retroactive sentencing since the amendment is 23 months, lowering the average sentence from 131 months to 108 months, the Justice Department said.

Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates said they were “modest reductions” for drug offenders, who will have served “substantial prison sentences.”

“The Department of Justice strongly supports sentencing reform for low-level, non-violent drug offenders,” she said in a statement. “The Sentencing Commission’s actions — which create modest reductions for drug offenders — is a step toward these necessary reforms.”


Japan to Host the Third World Congress on Probation!


Risk and Needs Assessment in the Criminal Justice System

Nathan James
Analyst in Crime Policy
July 24, 2015

Summary

The number of people incarcerated in the United States has increased significantly over the past three decades from approximately 419,000 inmates in 1983 to approximately 1.5 million inmates in 2013. Concerns about both the economic and social consequences of the country’s growing reliance on incarceration have led to calls for reforms to the nation’s criminal justice system.

There have been legislative proposals to implement a risk and needs assessment system in federal prisons. The system would be used to place inmates in rehabilitative programs. Under the proposed system some inmates would be eligible to earn additional time credits for participating in rehabilitative programs that reduce their risk of recidivism. Such credits would allow inmates to be placed on prerelease custody earlier. The proposed system would exclude inmates convicted of certain offenses from being eligible to earn additional time credits.

Risk and needs assessment instruments typically consist of a series of items used to collect data on behaviors and attitudes that research indicates are related to the risk of recidivism. Generally, inmates are classified as being high, moderate, or low risk. Assessment instruments are comprised of static and dynamic risk factors. Static risk factors do not change, while dynamic risk factors can either change on their own or be changed through an intervention. In general, research suggests that the most commonly used assessment instruments can, with a moderate level of accuracy, predict who is at risk for violent recidivism. It also suggests that no single instrument is superior to any other when it comes to predictive validity.

The Risk-Needs-Responsivity (RNR) model has become the dominant paradigm in risk and needs assessment. The risk principle states that high-risk offenders need to be placed in programs that provide more intensive treatment and services while low-risk offenders should receive minimal or even no intervention. The need principle states that effective treatment should focus on addressing needs that contribute to criminal behavior. The responsivity principle states that rehabilitative programming should be delivered in a style and mode that is consistent with the ability and learning style of the offender.

However, the wide-scale adoption of risk and needs assessment in the criminal justice system is not without controversy. Several critiques have been raised against the use of risk and needs assessment, including that it could have discriminatory effects because some risk factors are correlated with race; that it uses group base rates for recidivism to make determinations about an individual’s propensity for re-offending; and that risk and needs assessment are two distinct procedures and should be conducted separately.

There are several issues policymakers might contemplate should Congress choose to consider legislation to implement a risk and needs assessment system in federal prisons, including the following:

  • Should risk and needs assessment be used in federal prisons?
  • Should certain inmates be excluded from earning additional time credits?
  • Should risk assessment be incorporated into sentencing?
  • Should there be a decreased focus on punishing offenders?

Read the full document here.


The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) met on September 9-10, 2015 in San Diego, CA.

DURING THE TWO-DAY meeting, the CCCN connected with a local probation department and held a live national discussion with criminal justice professionals across the country. On Day 1, the CCCN met with San Diego County Probation Chief Mack Jenkins and his staff who provided network members with a tour of their Community Transition Center (CTC), which is co-located with a residential alcohol and drug treatment center – The Lighthouse. During the tour, CCCN members were able to see first-hand resource utilization from a local probation department and continuity of care for justice-involved individuals from California State Prisons to the community. The CTC is the site of a multi-disciplinary team comprised of licensed mental health clinicians, a nurse case manager, two Medi-Cal application assisters, and multiple probation officers. The center offers a continuum of services; including being tested for current substance usage, and assessed for criminogenic, substance abuse/mental health, and other needs. A case plan is developed– factoring in risks and needs – with input from the entire team and based on assessment results linking each individual at the CTC directly to the services they need to help them successfully transition back into the community.

Read more…


Have a look at this video montage of pictures taken throughout the Second World Congress on Community Corrections.


Download PDF  –  Download for MS Word


NIC logo

CCCN LIVE National Forum Discussion

CCCN LIVE National Forum Discussion via Webex – San Diego, CA September 10, 2015
The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) will be hosting a live national forum discussion with our federal partners and national and local experts, to highlight the unique opportunities and resources that are now available to our criminal justice system. When we look at who is locked up in our prisons and jails or juvenile facilities around the country, the data show that there are hundreds of thousands of individuals who had a drug, mental health or associated treatment need that went unmet.

Date: September 10, 2015

Time: Please note webinar start time/your time zone:

10:00-11:30am PT / 11:00-12:30pm MT/AZ/ 12:00pm-1:30pm CT / 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

Target Audience: Criminal Justice Professionals, Corrections Health Professionals, Community-based Providers

Resources now available are a potential “game changer” for the criminal justice system and for justice-involved individuals. The intent of this live national discussion, via Webex Event Center, is to bring awareness of the resources available through federal funding that can assist criminal justice agencies to help meet the demands of those that we serve. The CCCN believes that treating justice-involved individuals in the community can be a safe, cost-efficient alternative to incarceration if properly resourced. The cost of incarceration is significant, both in terms of fiscal implications, but also the collateral consequences for the individuals in the system, their families, and our communities. We can take a proactive approach in our local and state jurisdictions to reduce recidivism, be more efficient with our resources, keep people connected to their families and their communities, and to significantly reduce the cycle of incarceration in our country.

Objectives

• Highlight federal resources available to community corrections and criminal justice agencies;

• Define service needs of justice involved individuals;

• Showcase a local example of resource utilization; and

• Engage the criminal justice system in a live discussion about the resources available, how to access funding, receive technical assistance, and to motivate our leaders to want to do more.

What is the Community Corrections Collaborative Network?

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) is a network comprised of the leading associations representing 90,000-plus probation, parole, pretrial, and treatment professionals around the country, including the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), the Association of Paroling Authorities International (APAI), the Federal Probation and Pretrial Officers Association (FPPOA), the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies (NAPSA), and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE).

More Information and Registration


Crosspoint has found a home on East Side
GILBERT GARCIA OPINION COLUMNIST

Two weeks ago, Crosspoint Inc. quietly put a nagging legal challenge behind it.

In two months, the nonprofit will quietly celebrate the fifth anniversary of its East Side halfway house, at the site of an old Sisters of the Holy Spirit convent.

If the word “quietly” is the common thread here, that’s just the way Crosspoint CEO Kevin Downey likes it. After all, Crosspoint’s emergence on the East Side resulted in the most polarizing, vitriolic zoning battle this city has seen in the past 10 years.

Five-and-a-half years ago, former District 2 Councilwoman Sheila McNeil lamented in the pages of the San Antonio Express-News that the opening of the 100-bed East Side facility for transitioning former criminals would “mean the ruin of the entire inner-city community.”

READ MORE


NIC logo

Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will be conducting a live-streaming internet broadcast on justice-involved veterans, highlighting the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts across the country. The three-hour broadcast titled “Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way,” will be aired live on Wednesday, August 26, 2015.

From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons.

For these justice-involved vets, Veterans Treatment Courts are providing a pathway to recovery so that they can be restored to functioning and contributing members of society.

Veterans Treatment Courts, or VTCs, provide hope, restore families and save lives. The first VTC, founded in 2008 in Buffalo, New York, has inspired the creation of more than 220 courts of similar nature in jurisdictions, both large and small, across the country. Hundreds more are in various stages of planning and implementation.

These courts have the support of the communities they serve, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and local service providing agencies. Critical to the success of VTCs are veterans who volunteer to be trained and serve as mentors to justice-involved veterans.

Find out more


OMB No. 1121-0329

Approval Expires 07/31/2016

U.S. Department of Justice

Office of Justice Programs

Bureau of Justice Assistance

The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) is seeking applications for funding for the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Program. This program furthers the Department’s mission by providing resources to state, tribal, and local governments to implement comprehensive approaches to address the detection, prevention, and response to sexual abuse within confinement environments.

PREA Program: Demonstration Projects to Establish

“Zero Tolerance” Cultures for Sexual Assault in Correctional Facilities

FY 2015 Competitive Grant Announcement

Eligibility

Eligible applicants are limited to states, units of local governments, and federally recognized Indian tribes (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior). BJA welcomes applications that involve two or more entities; however, one eligible entity must be the applicant and the others must be proposed as subrecipients. The applicant must be the entity with primary responsibility for administering the funding and managing the entire program. Only one application per lead applicant will be considered; however, subrecipients may be part of multiple proposals. BJA may elect to make awards for applications submitted under this solicitation in future fiscal years, dependent on the merit of the applications and on the availability of appropriations.

Read More


March 24, 2015

The National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA) is seeking nominations for its annual NCJA Outstanding Criminal Justice Programs Awards. These awards honor successful criminal justice programs that use promising practices to address important crime and justice issues in communities.

Programs are evaluated using the following criteria:

  • Does the program address an important criminal justice issue?
  • Does the program demonstrate collaboration among criminal justice and allied agencies or disciplines?
  • Can the program provide quantitative evidence of its effectiveness in accomplishing program goals?
  • Does the program leverage federal, state, local or other non-governmental funds and resources?
  • Can the program be easily replicated in other jurisdictions?

The NCJA will honor these winning programs at the 2015 National Forum on Criminal Justice during an Awards Luncheon on Tuesday, August 4. This year’s National Forum will take place August 2-4 in Atlanta, Georgia. Travel expenses will be provided for one representative from each winning program.

To learn tips and tricks for submitting successful nomination packages check out the webcast from our webinar on March 4.

A selection committee will review the nominations and select one program from each NCJA region and one outstanding tribal program to receive the award. The tribal program may be from any region in the country. To see previous award winners, please click here.

Nominations can be submitted online or by hard copy. An individual or agency may nominate as many programs as they wish. Please complete one form for each program.

A representative from the state agency administrator (SAA) along with the program director must sign each nomination form. To find the state administering agency in your state, please click here. Forms without these signatures will not be considered.

Nominations for outstanding programs must be submitted no later than 5 p.m. ET on Friday, April 17, 2015. Nominations will be accepted online, or by email, fax (202) 448-1723 or mail to: NCJA, 720 7th St. NW, Third Floor, Washington, DC 20001.




 


In remembrance of a great man, Norm Chamberlain, we would like to share this video showing how dedicated he was. Norm will be sorely missed by everyone.

“Norm was a tremendous gift not only to Pioneer, but to the entire Rainier Valley community and we will all miss him tremendously.  He and his wife Barb, have dedicated their lives to Pioneer, and this company would not be what it is today without their combined efforts.”

Please click here to watch the video.


Irish Innocence Project Secures First Pardon

Thanks to the work of the Irish Innocence Project at Griffith College Dublin and the ‘Justice for Harry Gleeson’ group, it was announced recently that Harry Gleeson – a Tipperary man wrongfully executed for the murder of his neighbour, Moll McCarthy, in 1941 – will be the first recipient of a presidential posthumous pardon from the Irish State.

SAVE THE DATE – 26th & 27th JUNE 2015

The Irish Innocence Project International Conference

on Wrongful Convictions, Human Rights and the Student Learning Experience – 26th of June 2015

This conference will be a first of its kind. Never before have law, journalism and innocence work professionals, exonerees and higher education students from Ireland and around the globe been invited to come together to share their clinical experience pursuing innocence and human rights work. The conference features a keynote address by Gareth Peirce, who successfully overturned the wrongful convictions of the Guildford Four and the Birmingham Six, as well as a talk by Innocence Project co-founders Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld, and presentation by “48 Hours” American television journalist and lawyer Erin Moriarty.

Both conference and film festival programs are expected to be high impact, high profile events attended by international VIPs, celebrities and dignitaries. The aim of these two robust days are to:

  • Increase understanding and awareness of wrongful convictions as a human rights issue
  • Promote the role that both law and the media has in addressing miscarriages of justice
  • Inspire a new generation of young people to pursue innocence and human rights work

We would be delighted to welcome our friends and colleagues from around the globe. We are also encouraging students with a passion for justice and human rights to come and are offering discounted prices for them.


Dublin is a dynamic, historic city with outstanding museums and attractions, abundant pubs, traditional Irish music and dance, and top-rated restaurants. Enjoy the Irish experience while you’re here.


Register and Prepare for “Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement” live broadcast

Live Broadcast Registration and Preparation Information

Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement

There is still time to join us for a three hour live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process.

“I think during reentry that a crime victim should be viewed as an opportunity, not an obligation. They can bring great input to the process.” – Anne Seymour, National Victims Advocate

February 18, 2015

9am PT / 10am MT/AZ / 11am CT/ 12pm ET

Overview

Join us for a live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. During this three hour program, we will explore the current points in the criminal justice reentry continuum where victims can and should have a voice. By including victims we can obtain more balanced information about the offender and their offense history which can positively impact reentry decisions. This approach can result in better outcomes for the community, offenders and victims through enhanced offender accountability, increased victim satisfaction, and community safety.


Christine M. Cole has been appointed as the Executive Director of the Crime and Justice Institute at Community Resources for Justice. Headquartered in Boston, MA, with additional offices and contracts around the nation, the Crime and Justice Institute (CJI) works to make criminal and juvenile justice systems more efficient, promoting accountability while achieving better outcomes.

“We are thrilled that Christine will be joining our staff,” said Scott Harshbarger, chair of the CRJ board of directors. “Her experience across many disciplines, combined with her national and international network of professional contacts, will be important as we move our work at CJI to the next level.”


PRETRIAL SERVICES: AN EFFECTIVE ALTERNATIVE TO MONETARY BAIL

California’s Public Safety Realignment Act, which shifted the responsibility of adults convicted of low-level offences from the state to the counties, was intended to encourage counties to employ innovative and effective alternatives to incarceration. Many California counties, however, have continued to rely heavily on incarceration, pushing their jails to capacity. In an attempt to reduce jail overcrowding, attention is turning to the 63 percent of people held in county jails who have not been convicted of a crime. Many of these people are waiting for their day in court in jail – not because they pose a risk to public safety, but simply because they cannot afford to post bail.

Read the full document here.


CCCN’s next meeting is scheduled for March 4-5, 2015 in Washington, D.C.

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) will meet in Washington, D.C. on March 4-5, 2015. Network members will be in town to support the International Community Corrections Association’s D.C. day, which is scheduled for Tuesday, March 3, 2015. The CCCN will take part in a panel discussion on community corrections. Following ICCA’s D.C. day, at the network meeting, the CCCN will host a roundtable discussion with both national experts and our local federal partners on the Affordable Care Act and Community Corrections. This discussion will help shape our network’s goals to leverage the opportunities the ACA provides.

CCCN’s 2014 brief titled “Key Opportunities to Advance Safe and Smart Community Corrections Policies”

“The Affordable Care Act provides a significant opportunity to help the field reduce the use of incarceration and meet individuals’ needs outside the criminal justice system. Under the health care reform expansion, up to 15 million previously uninsured low income adults will be eligible for health care coverage. This change alone creates the opportunity to support the drug treatment, mental health and associated needs of millions of individuals before they end up more entrenched in the criminal justice system. We can accomplish this through diversion and drug courts, and pay for the treatment of individuals leaving correctional facilities, and those who are currently on probation, parole and pretrial supervision status.”

You can access a copy of the CCCN’s brief at: //static.nicic.gov/UserShared/2014-07-29_cccn_brief_from_spring_meeting_7__25_14.pdf

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) is comprised of the leading associations nowrepresenting nearly 90,000-plus probation, parole, pretrial, and treatment professionals around the country, including the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), the Association of Paroling Authorities International (APAI), the Federal Probation and Pretrial Officers Association (FPPOA), the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies (NAPSA), and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE).

This is the first time in community corrections, that the leading associations have come together to speak with one voice. The CCCN is highly committed to making a difference in community corrections.

View our newly revised position paper, “Safe and Smart Ways to Solve America’s Correctional Challenges”, here://community.nicic.gov/wikis/cccn/cccn-s-position-paper-safe-and-smart-ways-to-solve-america-s-correctional-challenges.aspx

Additional CCCN resources:

Community Corrections Collaborative Network, Radio Show 223, Greg Crawford, CPS at NIC, and Network Manager for the CCCN, along with Spurgeon Kennedy, Vice President of the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies, and Phil Nunes, President of the International Community Corrections Association://media.csosa.gov/podcast/audio/2014/09/community-corrections-collaborative-network-national-institute-corrections/

A National Consensus on Community Corrections-National Institute of Corrections” Radio Show 196, Greg Crawford, CPS at NIC, and Network Manager for CCCN along with Spurgeon Kennedy, Vice President of the National Association of Pretrial Services.

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact Greg Crawford, Network Manager, and Correctional Program Specialist at NIC at: 202-514-4273.




Correctional Populations in the United States, 2013
Lauren E. Glaze, Danielle Kaeble
Just released 12/19/14
Presents statistics on offenders supervised by adult correctional systems in the United States at yearend 2013, including offenders supervised in the community on probation or parole and those incarcerated in prison or local jail. The report provides the size and change in the total correctional population during 2013. It details the slowing rate of decline in the population since 2010 and the downward trend in the correctional supervision rate since 2007. It also examines the impact of changes in the community supervision and incarcerated populations on the total correctional population in recent years. Findings cover the size of the male and female correctional populations and compare the rates of change in the populations by correctional status since 2000. Appendix tables provide information on other correctional populations, including prisoners under military jurisdiction, inmates held by correctional authorities in the U.S. territories and commonwealths, and jail inmates held in Indian country facilities, and estimates of the total correctional population by jurisdiction and correctional status. Findings are based on data from several BJS correctional data collections.
Highlights:
  • An estimated 6,899,000 persons were under the supervision of adult correctional systems at yearend 2013, a decline of about 41,500 from yearend 2012.
  • The decline in the correctional population during 2013 (0.6%) was less than 1% for the second consecutive year, down from 2.1% in 2010 when the fastest annual decline in the population was observed.
  • For the second consecutive year, the community supervision (down 0.6%) and incarcerated (down 0.5%) populations declined by less than 1%.
  • All of the decline in the correctional population during 2013 resulted from decreases in the probation (down 32,100) and local jail (down 13,300) populations.
  • About 1 in 35 adults (2.8%) in the United States was under some form of correctional supervision at yearend 2013, unchanged from 2012.
  • About 1 in 51 adults was on probation or parole at yearend 2013, compared to 1 in 110 adults incarcerated in prison or local jail.


 

Please join ICCA when we host our Community Corrections Public Policy Forum in Washington, D.C. on Tuesday March 3, 2015

This forum will feature criminal justice leaders from the Private & Public sectors in order to highlight current trends, pending legislation and relevant updates for those working within community corrections.


 

American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), in partnership with International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), are co-hosting the World Congress on Community Corrections, at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites in Los Angeles, California, USA, on July 14-16, 2015.


NIC logo

Items of interest from the final FY15 bill:

  • Byrne Competitive grants are eliminated.  Funded at $14 million last year, these grants are used for promising practices and for national initiatives to improve the criminal justice system.
  • Criminal history grants will increase to $73 million, up from $59 million in FY14.  This account combines funding for the National Criminal History Improvement Program (NCHIP) and the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS), of which $25 million is for grants to improve records in NICS, particularly mental health records.
  • Rape kit backlog reduction receives $41 million for a new competitive grant program.  The funding is to support “multi-disciplinary community response teams,” a model that will be developed by NIJ and that will include planning, implementation and long-term evaluation.
  • Anti-heroin efforts receive $7 million for a new competitive grant program to state law enforcement agencies in states with high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids.
  • Regional anti-gang task forces receive $7 million for a new grant program.
  • Prescription drug monitoring will increase to $11 million, up from $7 million in FY14.
  • Juvenile justice state formula grants will increase slightly to $56 million, up from $55 million in FY14.
  • COPS grants are level-funded at $180 million, although funding for hiring will drop to $134.5 million after carve-outs, down from $151 million in FY14.
  • The comprehensive school safety initiative is again funded at $75 million.  This money is for research and grants.
  • Justice Reinvestment Initiative is level-funded at $28 million.
  • Reimbursement to states and local governments under the State Criminal Alien Assistance Program is up slightly to $185 million, up from $180 million in FY14.
  • Residential Substance Abuse Treatment grants are level-funded at $10 million.
  • Debbie Smith and other DNA-related grant programs are level-funded at $125 million.
  • Office on Violence Against Women STOP formula grants are up slightly to $195 million, up from $193 million in FY14.
  • OJP’s diagnostic center and state help desk are zero-funded.

NIC logo

House appropriators released  the fiscal 2015 Omnibus Appropriations bill, which provides complete funding for 11 of the 12 appropriations bills through Sept. 30, 2015 (Homeland Security will be funded by a CR through Feb. 27). The House is planning to vote as early as Thursday on the measure, which would then go to the Senate. Current government funding runs out on Dec. 11. Lawmakers may need to move a very short-term continuing resolution to avoid a government shutdown.

Second Chance Act

FY15  $68m

Smart probation: $6m

Children of Incarcerated Parents: $5m

Pay for Success: $7.5m

FY14  $67.7m

MIOTCRA

FY15 $8.5m

FY14 $8.2m

Justice Reinvestment

FY15 $27.5m

Colson Task Force:$750, 000

FY14 $27.5m

Reginald B. Darby

Senior Policy Analyst, Government Affairs

Council of State Governments Justice Center


Recently, legislation was introduced to improve the Second Chance Act passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee with bipartisan support. The Second Chance Act supports state and local reentry programs to reduce recidivism.

Rather than incarcerating repeat offenders in the same communities’ generation after generation, we can put our taxpayer dollars to better use to break this vicious cycle and turn lives around. The ultimate goal of our criminal justice system is to make our families stronger and our communities safer. The work done under the Second Chance Act helps accomplish that goal, one life at a time, and we are one step closer to its passage.

An outline of the Second Chance Reauthorization Act of 2013 can be found HERE.  A sectional analysis of the bill is available HERE, and text of legislation can be found HERE.


NIC logo

DC Public Safety Radio features the Community Corrections Collaborative Network

As ICCA President, Phil Nunes sits on the National Institute for Corrections Community Corrections Collaborative Committee and last week when in DC he participated in a radio show on DC Public Safety Radio.

Click Here to Listen
Or Here to find out more about the show.


PREA logoUpdate: National PREA Resource Center

International Community Corrections Association

The Field-Initiated arm of the National PREA Resource Center (PRC) continues to be very busy fielding requests for assistance as well as answering questions from the field.

The PRC has an ongoing commitment to providing PREA implementation assistance both prior to an audit or following for corrective action plan implementation. The array of assistance is quite large, from standards questions and resource identification, to policy and procedure revisions and targeted on-site assistance such as training that focuses on gaps identified in the audit. The PRC encourages you to reach out with questions and requests for assistance related to the standards.

For questions about the standards or resource identification, including archived webinars or publications, please complete the form found at this link: //www.prearesourcecenter.org/about/contact-us

To request targeted assistance, please complete the form found at this link: //www.prearesourcecenter.org/training-technical-assistance/request-for-assistance


Risk Assessment Instruments Validated and Implemented in Correctional Settings in the United States: An Empirical Guide

INTRODUCTION

The rates of crime, incarceration, and correctional supervision are disproportionately high in the U.S. and translate into exorbitant costs to individuals, the public, and the state. Within three years of release from jail or prison, twoSthirds of offenders are rearrested and half are incarcerated for a new crime or parole violation. Though many offenders recidivate, a considerable proportion do not. Thus, there is a need to identify those offenders at greater risk of recidivism and to allocate resources and target risk management and rehabilitation efforts accordingly. Risk assessment, a crucial component to implementing evidenceSbased recidivism reduction strategies, is the process of estimating the likelihood an offender will recidivate by identifying those offenders at higher risk and in greater need of interventions. Assessment results, based on ratings of empirically or theoretically based risk and/or protective factors, can be used to determine intervention targets, appropriate programming level and intensity, and supervision level. There is overwhelming evidence to suggest that assessments of risk completed using structured approaches produce estimates that are both more accurate and more consistent across assessors compared to subjective or unstructured approaches. More and more, structured risk assessment approaches are being used in correctional agencies.

Read More


Reentry Matters: Strategies and Successes of Second Chance Act Grantees Across the United States

With over 95 percent of people in the nation’s state prisons expected to be released at some point, officials at all levels of government recognize the need forinitiatives to support the successful reentry of these individuals to their communities. For the estimated 60,000 youth incarcerated in juvenile detention and correctional facilities on any given day, there is a particular urgency to help them avoid crime and improve their prospects for a successful future when released.

In 2008, Congress responded to these needs by passing the Second Chance Act, first-of-its-kind legislation that was enacted with bipartisan support and backed by a broad spectrum of leaders in law enforcement, corrections, courts, behavioral health, and other areas. The legislation authorizes federal grants that support reentry programs for adults and juveniles, nearly 600 of which have been awarded to government agencies and nonprofit organizations in 49 states by the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Justice Programs.

The program snapshots below illustrate the positive impact these reentry initiatives can have by focusing on areas vital to reintegration back into the community, including employment, education, mentoring, and substance abuse and mental health treatment. Also highlighted are programs that address the needs of a particular population, such as youth, women, and tribal communities. Representing a wide range of populations served, these programs also demonstrate the diversity of approaches that can address recidivism and increase public safety.

Read the full document


Register and Prepare for “Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement” live broadcast

Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement

There is still time to join us for a three hour live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process.

“I think during reentry that a crime victim should be viewed as an opportunity, not an obligation. They can bring great input to the process.” – Anne Seymour, National Victims Advocate

February 18, 2015

9am PT / 10am MT/AZ / 11am CT/ 12pm ET

Overview

Join us for a live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. During this three hour program, we will explore the current points in the criminal justice reentry continuum where victims can and should have a voice. By including victims we can obtain more balanced information about the offender and their offense history which can positively impact reentry decisions. This approach can result in better outcomes for the community, offenders and victims through enhanced offender accountability, increased victim satisfaction, and community safety.


2014 ICCA DC Forum

On March 11th, 2014, fifty ICCA members attended our annual DC Day Forum held at the True Reformer Building in Washington, DC.  Those in attendance received valuable information regarding current initiatives and coming trends in the field of community corrections.  Presenters represented both governmental and private agencies including:

  • The Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention
  • National PREA Resource Center
  • National Criminal Justice Association
  • Council of State Governments
  • Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Public Welfare Foundation
  • International Corrections & Prisons Association
  • National Institute of Corrections

Each presentation was followed by a Q&A session, with lively feedback from the audience.  Participants received summaries of pending legislation relative to community corrections issues.  As is the usual practice for ICCA members, many Forum participants scheduled meetings with their legislators on the following day to express support for these pending bills, as well as to discuss their local initiatives.

After a one year hiatus, ICCA was pleased to be able to bring back this annual forum for our membership.  Our thanks to Community Resources for Justice and Dismas Charities for sponsoring the Forum luncheon, and to SecurManage for sponsoring the reception.  We also thank the Pillsbury Law Firm for providing space for the ICCA Board meeting and Strategic Planning session on March 10th.

Pillsbury logo

 


NIC logo

An Informational Webinar on NIC’s Dosage Probation Solicitation

//community.nicic.gov/blogs/nic/archive/2014/09/08/nic-s-dosage-probation-solicitation-an-informational-webinar.aspx

Date: Monday, September 29, 2014

Time: Please note webinar start time/your time zone:

10:00-11:30am PT / 11:00-12:30pm MT/AZ/ 12:00pm-1:30pm CT / 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

Target Audience: Multidisciplinary teams (i.e., courts, corrections, prosecution, defense, probation, victim services, and treatment) at the county and/or city level

Overview: The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) seeks to identify two jurisdictions to engage in a partnership to pilot test a new model of probation supervision, Dosage Probation. The Dosage Probation Model builds on evidence-based and promising practices to restructure sentencing and probation management practices, with the goal of improving offender outcomes (i.e., recidivism reduction) and decreasing the costs associated with lengthy supervision terms. Key elements of the Dosage Probation Model include incentivizing offenders’ engagement in risk-reducing activities, ensuring offenders receive interventions and services that have been demonstrated effective in reducing recidivism, and providing the opportunity for early termination from supervision when risk reduction goals have been met.

Once selected, pilot sites will receive technical assistance (TA) over approximately 24 months for both planning and implementation activities. While no direct funding will be provided to jurisdictions selected to participate in the project, pilot sites will receive the benefit of technical assistance from assigned TA providers.

Webinar Objectives:  NIC and project staff will review the materials contained in the solicitation-particularly the goals of the project, specifics that dosage probation model pilot sites will be expected to implement, and the applications requirements-and respond to webinar participants’ questions about the project and the application process.

Addition Reading/Preparation: Prior to the webinar, applicants are encouraged to read Dosage Probation: Rethinking the Structure of Probation Sentences (see: https://s3.amazonaws.com/static.nicic.gov/Library/027940.pdf ), which provides a policy and practice framework for this new model of supervision.

Participants are asked to review the solicitation in its entirety prior to the webinar, including Appendix 1: the Dosage Probation Implementation Protocol, to determine whether the local community is well suited for participation in this project.


Date & Time
Thursday, December 11, 2014, 3:00 – 4:30 pm

Speakers

  • Dr. Edward J. Latessa, Professor and Director, School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati
  • Dr. Kimberly Sperber, Director, Center for Health and Human Services Research at Talbert House
  • Amy Pipas, ETO Administrator, Operation New Hope

Moderator

  • Josie Alleman, Strategic Initiatives Consultant, Social Solutions

Join Dr. Ed Latessa, Dr. Kimberly Sperber, and Amy Pipas to hear how we can improve public safety by providing the right amounts and types of reentry services to the right groups of people. Research has shown that we should be investing our reentry resources in those offenders who are at highest risk for recidivism,    and that if we provide too many services for low risk participants, they may commit more crimes than if they  had no services at all. But what types of services – and exactly how much – works for each group?

Hear from criminal justice national experts Dr. Latessa and Dr. Sperber. Dr. Latessa has done much of the research on the risk-need-responsivity principle in reentry services. He will talk about what services work for different populations and why it is so important to consider risk level when working with participants. Dr. Sperber’s research focuses on identifying the right amount of services for the different reentry risk groups.    She will talk about using data not only to track the type and amount of services for the different groups, but  also to figure out what amount of services actually works in practice.

Ms. Pipas will talk about how to use to make this research work in the field and how her organization,   Operation New Hope, tracks their data to make sure they are providing the right services to the right people.

https://cc.readytalk.com/r/b6y952dqgyjc&;;eom(Please copy and paste this web address into your browser if a new page doesn’t launch properly when you click on the registration link.)

Speaker Bios

Dr. Latessa received his Ph.D. from the Ohio State University in 1979 and is a Professor and Director of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Latessa has published over 140 works in the     area of criminal justice, corrections, and juvenile justice. He is co-author of eight books including What Works (and Doesn’t) in Reducing Recidivism, Corrections in the Community, and Corrections in America. Professor Latessa has directed over 150 funded research projects including studies of day reporting centers, juvenile justice programs, drug courts, prison programs, intensive supervision programs, halfway houses, and drug programs. He and his staff have also assessed over 600 correctional programs throughout the United States, and he has provided assistance and workshops in over forty-five states. Dr. Latessa served as President of    the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (1989-90). He has also received numerous awards. Some of the most recent are: Marguerite Q. Warren and Ted B. Palmer Differential Intervention Award presented by the Division of Corrections and Sentencing of the American Society of Criminology (2010), Outstanding    Community Partner Award from the Arizona Department of Juvenile Corrections (2010), and Maud Booth Correctional Services Award in recognition of dedicated service and leadership presented by the Volunteers     of America (2010).

Dr. Sperber received her Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati in 2003 and has worked      in the field for more than 20 years. She is experienced in both conducting research and operationalizing evidence-based practices in the field and currently oversees the Center for Health and Human Services Research (CHHSR) at Talbert House. In her role, Dr. Sperber oversees research in the areas of addiction, mental health, corrections, primary care, and implementation science. Her most recent research has focused  on matching correctional program dosage to offender risk, effectively addressing opiate addiction, and evaluating EPICS as a case management model in residential correctional environments. Dr. Sperber is also involved in helping her agency to implement, monitor, and respond to Continuous Quality Improvement    metrics that assess the agency’s performance in terms of process, outcomes, and treatment fidelity.

Ms. Pipas Pipas is the ETO Administrator at Operation New Hope in Jacksonville, Florida. She is responsible  for ensuring data accuracy in the ETO system as well as developing reports to analyze how the program is performing. Throughout the past ten years she has worked for non-profits assisting with program coordination and evaluation. She has an undergraduate degree from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington in Sociology and a Masters of Arts in Social Policy from Empire State College.


world congress

 


Updated Brief from CCCN’s Spring Meeting

CCCN

Key Opportunities to Advance Safe and Smart Community Corrections Policies

The probation, parole, pretrial agencies, diversion agencies, specialty courts and nonprofits partners that together comprise the community corrections field and serve nearly five million clients each year are at a critical crossroads: As prison and jail costs continue to rise, and as more and more evidence on what works and doesn’t work to curb offending and change people’s lives emerges, policymakers are coming to see that a strong community corrections system is a key antidote to America’s mass incarceration challenge. Probation, parole, pretrial, diversion, specialty courts and our nonprofit partners are now being seen as Safe and Smart alternatives to incarceration. And now, as new opportunities emerging through health care reform and expanded focus on reentry, there is a need to press policymakers on key issues to help community corrections achieve our new public safety mission.

Click here to read more.


Sacramento County’s Adult Day Reporting Center Offers Hope for Change

A dozen men gathered in a classroom at the Sacramento County Probation Department’s Adult Day Reporting Center, where probationers are required to participate in life skills classes to fulfill their sentences. The Thinking for a Change class uses role playing to reinforce techniques to cope with anger management, impulse control and other exercises of mind over emotions.

Read the full article here.


CCCN

CCCN’s Paradigm Shifts

Some changes are in the works at the Community Corrections Collaborative Network.

Full Details Here


National Institute of Corrections News

06/02/2014 04:29 PM EDT

Register Now – Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes

Jun. 18, 2014–This three-hour live broadcast is meant to inform and increase awareness around the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) to enhance collaboration between the criminal justice/corrections and healthcare systems.

9am PT / 9am AZT/ 10am MT / 11am CT/ 12pm ET

Register Now at this link //nicic.gov/training/sib201406 (green button on the right)

Overview

Research shows that there are a disproportionate number of justice involved individuals suffering from chronic illness and/ or mental health and substance abuse disorders. We also know that a majority of the justice-involved individuals are young adults and unemployed or earn an income that is well below the federal poverty line leaving them without the ability to obtain health care. There is now an opportunity to enhance collaboration between the criminal justice/corrections and healthcare systems.

Early estimates indicate a significant number of justice-involved individuals may be eligible for provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), specifically; enrollment in Medicaid or the ability to purchase health care coverage through state health insurance exchanges. Because of the many health care expansion possibilities for this population we are witnessing an unprecedented opportunity to help connect the justice population to healthcare coverage and the associated healthcare services.

Federal, state and local criminal justice systems are poised to change the way they do business with the advent of the ACA. It is now possible for millions of low income, justice- involved individuals to obtain healthcare or insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health needs. This far reaching system change will impact every decision point in the criminal justice system from arrest to individuals returning to the community upon release.

Objectives

This broadcast is meant to inform and increase awareness around this historic healthcare expansion opportunity. The broadcast will highlight promising practices by providing resources and strategies to expand healthcare coverage to justice-involved individuals. During this national discussion and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters will:

  • Establish the relevance of the Affordable Care Act to the criminal justice system and how to leverage opportunities to expand healthcare coverage to justice-involved individuals.
  • Provide concrete examples for collaboration and system linkages between the criminal justice system and healthcare system.
  • Provide healthcare enrollment strategies to increase informed decision-making between criminal justice and healthcare stakeholders.

Audience

This broadcast is free and available to anyone. The following groups are especially encouraged to participate:

  • Criminal Justice and Corrections Leadership
  • Law enforcement, jails, pretrial
  • Courts (judges, prosecutor/defense)
  • Community supervision (local, state, tribal and federal probation)
  • Prison, reentry and parole
  • Criminal Justice/Community Health Care Providers
  • National Correctional Associations (ACA, APPA, NJA, NCCHC, etc.)
  • Federal Agency Stakeholders
  • Healthcare Coalitions
  • Re-Entry Coordinators and Collaboratives

ICCA 2014 annual award nominations now open

ICCA is accepting nominations for its annual awards. We encourage you to submit your nominations to recognize your contemporaries who lead our organization and the field of community corrections. There are six awards open for nominations:

  • Margaret Mead Award: Recognizing an individual who has demonstrated leadership in the field of community corrections.
  • McDonald Leadership and Service Award: Recognizing individual (s) who have demonstrated a commitment to community-based corrections.
  • Dillingham Public Service Award: Recognizing an individual who has demonstrated “Quiet Leadership” in community corrections.
  • Judicial Award: Presented to an active or retired Judiciary practitioner who promotes and furthers the cause of community corrections.
  • J. Bryan Riley Award: Recognizing an individual whose work exemplifies the ideals of ICCA and who have delivered outstanding service to community corrections.
  • Charlie Flowers Award: Recognizing an individual or organization which has demonstrated a strong spirit of support for and collaboration with ICCA.

Survey of the Community Corrections Field

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) needs your help to highlight the issues that matter most to community corrections professionals like you. CCCN is a partnership of national and international community corrections organizations. We are a forum for partner associations to develop and work on emerging issues, activities and goals within the community corrections field. Our objectives are to create a shared message and understanding of community corrections; influence community corrections legislation, funding and policy at the federal, state and local levels; assist in prioritizing research areas that emerge from international and national operational experience which promotes evidence based practices; and enhance the effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability of community corrections-related professional associations. The International Community Corrections Association (ICCA) is proud to be a member of the CCCN, along with our partners.

To meet its mission and to ensure that the voice of the practitioner is heard in the national debate on criminal justice priorities, CCCN is conducting a survey of our association memberships. This survey will solicit opinions from those in the field about the state of community corrections, the most significant issues and opportunities facing the field, and the priorities the field should advocate in the future. CCCN will use the input from this survey to identify the most important current and emerging issues and trends in the field and to help Federal, state and local policy makers and funders direct resources to programs and activities that best promote public safety, address defendant and offender risks and needs, and ensure defendant and offender accountability.

Please join CCCN and ICCA in shaping the national dialogue on community corrections by completing the survey at the link below.

Thanks!


Dosage Probation: Rethinking the Structure of Probation Sentences

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the Center for Effective Public Policy are pleased to announce the release of NIC’s publication, Dosage Probation: Rethinking the Structure of Probation Sentences, a document authored by Madeline M. Carter, Principal, Center for Effective Public Policy and the Honorable Richard J. Sankovitz, Milwaukee County Circuit Court.

Please click on the link below for the full press release and link to the document:


5th United Nations International Corrections in Peacekeeping Conference

“Promoting Partnerships and Best Practices in Support of Prison Programmes in United Nations Peace Operations”

Planning for Fifth United Nations International Corrections in Peacekeeping Conference in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, from 8 to 10 July 2014, is well underway. The organizing team from Burkina Faso is excited to be hosting the conference. The theme of this year’s conference is “Promoting Partnerships and Best Practices in Support of Prison Programmes in United Nations Peace Operations.”

The conference will provide a special opportunity to review developments, activities, opportunities and challenges in the United Nations corrections sector, and to consider practical steps to strengthen support to national authorities in post-conflict / peacebuilding settings. Participants will include representatives from Member States, field missions, United Nations Headquarters, United Nations Agencies, Funds and Programmes, and other partner organizations.

If you are interested in speaking at or participating in the conference, please contact Ms. Annika Kovar and Mr. Michael Langelaar who will inform you of available time slots in the programme as well as the registration process.

Please note that French and Arabic translation services will be provided during the conference.

The cost of travel, accommodation and food will be covered by the participant or sending organization. Burkina Faso is sponsoring a dinner event and lunches during the conference. Please find attached a list of recommended hotels in Ouagadougou.


National Institute of Corrections News

Live Online Broadcast – Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes
06/02/2014 04:29 PM EDT

Register Now – Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes

Jun. 18, 2014–This three-hour live broadcast is meant to inform and increase awareness around the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) to enhance collaboration between the criminal justice/corrections and healthcare systems.

9am PT / 9am AZT/ 10am MT / 11am CT/ 12pm ET

Overview

Research shows that there are a disproportionate number of justice involved individuals suffering from chronic illness and/ or mental health and substance abuse disorders. We also know that a majority of the justice-involved individuals are young adults and unemployed or earn an income that is well below the federal poverty line leaving them without the ability to obtain health care. There is now an opportunity to enhance collaboration between the criminal justice/corrections and healthcare systems.

Early estimates indicate a significant number of justice-involved individuals may be eligible for provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), specifically; enrollment in Medicaid or the ability to purchase health care coverage through state health insurance exchanges. Because of the many health care expansion possibilities for this population we are witnessing an unprecedented opportunity to help connect the justice population to healthcare coverage and the associated healthcare services.

Federal, state and local criminal justice systems are poised to change the way they do business with the advent of the ACA. It is now possible for millions of low income, justice- involved individuals to obtain healthcare or insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health needs. This far reaching system change will impact every decision point in the criminal justice system from arrest to individuals returning to the community upon release.

Objectives

This broadcast is meant to inform and increase awareness around this historic healthcare expansion opportunity. The broadcast will highlight promising practices by providing resources and strategies to expand healthcare coverage to justice-involved individuals. During this national discussion and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters will:

  • Establish the relevance of the Affordable Care Act to the criminal justice system and how to leverage opportunities to expand healthcare coverage to justice-involved individuals.
  • Provide concrete examples for collaboration and system linkages between the criminal justice system and healthcare system.
  • Provide healthcare enrollment strategies to increase informed decision-making between criminal justice and healthcare stakeholders.

Audience

This broadcast is free and available to anyone. The following groups are especially encouraged to participate:

  • Criminal Justice and Corrections Leadership
  • Law enforcement, jails, pretrial
  • Courts (judges, prosecutor/defense)
  • Community supervision (local, state, tribal and federal probation)
  • Prison, reentry and parole
  • Criminal Justice/Community Health Care Providers
  • National Correctional Associations (ACA, APPA, NJA, NCCHC, etc.)
  • Federal Agency Stakeholders
  • Healthcare Coalitions
  • Re-Entry Coordinators and Collaboratives

ICCA annual award nominations now open

ICCA is accepting nominations for its annual awards. We encourage you to submit your nominations to recognize your contemporaries who lead our organization and the field of community corrections. There are six awards open for nominations:

  • Margaret Mead Award: Recognizing an individual who has demonstrated leadership in the field of community corrections.
  • McDonald Leadership and Service Award: Recognizing individual (s) who have demonstrated a commitment to community-based corrections.
  • Dillingham Public Service Award: Recognizing an individual who has demonstrated “Quiet Leadership” in community corrections.
  • Judicial Award: Presented to an active or retired Judiciary practitioner who promotes and furthers the cause of community corrections.
  • J. Bryan Riley Award: Recognizing an individual whose work exemplifies the ideals of ICCA and who have delivered outstanding service to community corrections.
  • Charlie Flowers Award: Recognizing an individual or organization which has demonstrated a strong spirit of support for and collaboration with ICCA.

Survey of the Community Corrections Field

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) needs your help to highlight the issues that matter most to community corrections professionals like you. CCCN is a partnership of national and international community corrections organizations. We are a forum for partner associations to develop and work on emerging issues, activities and goals within the community corrections field. Our objectives are to create a shared message and understanding of community corrections; influence community corrections legislation, funding and policy at the federal, state and local levels; assist in prioritizing research areas that emerge from international and national operational experience which promotes evidence based practices; and enhance the effectiveness, efficiency and sustainability of community corrections-related professional associations. The International Community Corrections Association (ICCA) is proud to be a member of the CCCN, along with our partners.

To meet its mission and to ensure that the voice of the practitioner is heard in the national debate on criminal justice priorities, CCCN is conducting a survey of our association memberships. This survey will solicit opinions from those in the field about the state of community corrections, the most significant issues and opportunities facing the field, and the priorities the field should advocate in the future. CCCN will use the input from this survey to identify the most important current and emerging issues and trends in the field and to help Federal, state and local policy makers and funders direct resources to programs and activities that best promote public safety, address defendant and offender risks and needs, and ensure defendant and offender accountability.

Please join CCCN and ICCA in shaping the national dialogue on community corrections by completing the survey at the link below.

Thanks!


2014 ICCA DC Forum

On March 11th, 2014, fifty ICCA members attended our annual DC Day Forum held at the True Reformer Building in Washington, DC.  Those in attendance received valuable information regarding current initiatives and coming trends in the field of community corrections.  Presenters represented both governmental and private agencies including:

  • The Bureau of Justice Assistance
  • Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention
  • National PREA Resource Center
  • National Criminal Justice Association
  • Council of State Governments
  • Pew Charitable Trusts
  • Public Welfare Foundation
  • International Corrections & Prisons Association
  • National Institute of Corrections

Each presentation was followed by a Q&A session, with lively feedback from the audience.  Participants received summaries of pending legislation relative to community corrections issues.  As is the usual practice for ICCA members, many Forum participants scheduled meetings with their legislators on the following day to express support for these pending bills, as well as to discuss their local initiatives.

After a one year hiatus, ICCA was pleased to be able to bring back this annual forum for our membership.  Our thanks to Community Resources for Justice and Dismas Charities for sponsoring the Forum luncheon, and to SecurManage for sponsoring the reception.  We also thank the Pillsbury Law Firm for providing space for the ICCA Board meeting and Strategic Planning session on March 10th.

Pillsbury logo

 


Dosage Probation: Rethinking the Structure of Probation Sentences

The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the Center for Effective Public Policy are pleased to announce the release of NIC’s publication, Dosage Probation: Rethinking the Structure of Probation Sentences, a document authored by Madeline M. Carter, Principal, Center for Effective Public Policy and the Honorable Richard J. Sankovitz, Milwaukee County Circuit Court.

Please click on the link below for the full press release and link to the document:


Jeanine Webber

We regret to announce that Mr. Dave Pisapio is stepping down from his position as Region IX – Vice President. ICCA would like to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Pisapio for his great contributions to our association. We wish him the best of luck in his future endeavours and hope he will stay connected with us going forward.

We are pleased to share that we will not have a vacancy in this region since we are very fortunate to welcome Dr. Jeanine Webber. She has accepted the appointment into Region IX – Vice President effective immediately. We are confident that her expertise and experience will be an asset to our Board.

Dr. Jeanine Webber is a Registered Social Worker with 20 years of forensic experience. She is currently the Program Coordinator of the Bachelor of Applied Arts – Criminal Justice program at Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning in Toronto, Canada. Jeanine has worked in multiple settings within the Canadian criminal justice system including half way houses, a federal parole office, a maximum security penitentiary (the Kingston Penitentiary), and a federal community correctional centre. Specifically, her jobs have included Federal Parole Officer, Regional Trainer and Head of Correctional Programs. She also worked in Children’s Mental Health as a Researcher before joining Humber College Institute of Technology & Advanced Learning. Jeanine has completed program evaluation projects within “real world” community settings. Her research interests include program evaluation studies conducted within community agencies, children with conduct disorder, social justice, adult and youth correctional intervention programs, and crime prevention. She has a Bachelor of Arts in Social Development Studies from the University of Waterloo, a Honours Bachelor of Social Work from York University, a Master of Social Work Degree and a Doctor of Philosophy in Social Work from the University of Toronto.


What Works: Defeating Recidivism: Keys to Making it Happen

The final collaborative entry in the What Works series by ACA and the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), this collection of essays and responses from Frank Porporino, Shadd Maruna, the late D.A. Andrews, and many other leaders in prisoner reentry comes at a crucial time. Correctional administrations nationwide are coping with budget cutbacks while under pressure to deliver ever better public safety outcomes. How, with reductions in staffing and offender programming, can we continue to reduce recidivism? Keys to Making it Happen provides effective, economically feasible solutions as well as rigorously researched interpretations of the latest theories in prisoner reentry. Topics such as assessment tools, the Risk-Need-Responsivity model, the role of ritual in successful reentry, and what may be learned from “effectiveness” literature are discussed. This book, with an introduction and conclusion by editor Donald Evans, is a key addition to any community corrections department’s library. Shipping for this product has now begun. Click here to order online.


Note from Attorney General Eric Holder

Eric Holder

Recently, Attorney General Eric Holder noted, “Although incarceration has a role to play in our justice system, widespread incarceration at the tribal, federal, state and local levels is both ineffective and unsustainable”.  Additionally, he indicated that in 2010 the United States spent $80 billion to pay for the costs associated with incarcerating a large portion of our society.

A network of national and international membership associations representing more than 42,000 professionals representing pretrial, probation, parole and treatment professionals agree there are cost-effective ways to reduce crime, recidivism and victimization without placing everyone behind bars. According to the Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN), these methods work.

“The community corrections infrastructure is responsible for changing the behavior for 7 out of 10 individuals,” asserts the CCCN in its position paper, “Safe and Smart Ways to Solve America’s Correctional Challenges.” Yet, states and the federal government continue to spend more than 70 percent of their adult and juvenile correctional dollars on incarcerating individuals. Today, community corrections is the primary provider for more than 5 million offenders in the criminal justice system.

Research has shown that public safety is improved when the right interventions are applied to the right people at the right time. Tools now exist to help professionals identify which individuals are appropriate for community-based interventions, and which individuals need to be kept off the streets. The use of validated risk and need assessments can quickly aid adult and juvenile courts as they craft supervision, monitoring and treatment interventions.  This approach leads to better results for victims and the public.

Beyond financial cost, there are collateral impacts of mass incarceration.  The move in the federal system to begin to unravel the policies of the past is a move in the right direction. The CCCN stands ready to support the Attorney General and state legislatures as they seek solutions that are within reach.

The CCCN comprises the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), the Association of  Paroling Authorities International (APAI), the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE), and the National Association of Pretrial Service Agencies (NAPSA).  Collectively, these associations represent more than 42,000 professionals in the community corrections field.

The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) will serve as the forum to develop and work the emerging issues, activities, and goals for the community corrections field.

Learn more about the CCCN visit //community.nicic.gov/wikis/cccn/corrections-community-collaborative-network.aspx


2nd Annual Conference in the “What Matters” Series

Reno

Plan to attend the first in ICCA’s series of conferences on “What Matters” in Community Corrections. The Reno conference, Sept. 9th-12th, will bring researchers and practitioners together in a way that highlights the values underlying and informing our practice.

Plan to attend the first in ICCA’s series of conferences on “What Matters” in Community Corrections. The Reno conference, Sept. 9th-12th, will bring researchers and practitioners together in a way that highlights the values underlying and informing our practice. This research conference features commissioned keynote presentations and workshops highlighting evidence-based practices, and approaches that improve offender outcomes.

Conference tracks cover “What Matters” in the following areas:

  • Offender Supervision
  • Community Supervision of Women Offenders
  • Restorative Justice
  • Leadership in Community Corrections
  • Reducing Barriers to Effectiveness

John Larivee

John Larivee was asked by the US State Department to join its delegation for a dialogue with officials from the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The meetings were held in Beijing on April 24 and 25, 2012.

The US delegation was headed by Harold Koh, Legal Adviser of the Department of State who is on leave from Yale Law School where he served as Dean from 2004 to 2009; and Michael Posner, Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, and former Executive Director and President of Human Rights First.

The PRC delegation included members of the Supreme People’s Court and National People’s Congress, officials from the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Public Security and Supreme People’s Procurotorate, and representatives of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences and All China Lawyers’ Association.

The agenda included four items, including Community Corrections which John led the discussion along with Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle. Judge Huvelle sits on the US District Court for the District of Columbia and earlier in her career served as law clerk to Chief Justice Edward F. Hennessey of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

In the discussion on Community Corrections, the PRC delegation referenced pilot projects begun in 2003 in seven locations and noted that recent national legislation to expand such programming nationally was based on the experience of those pilots. The presentation by the Ministry of Justice focused on the challenges of implementation of the law, including limited resources (staff skills and program options), agency and staff resistance to change of practice, and weak public understanding. John described his work with the community corrections pilot in the Xuhui District of Shanghai in 2004-05 and congratulated the Ministry of Justice for its work to expand community corrections nationally. He reviewed the evidence-based principles that guide CRJ’s community corrections work, both on policy initiatives and our direct service programs. Finally, there was discussion of collaborative efforts that could follow.

The other agenda items and discussion leaders included:

  • Role of Lawyers – Honorable Goodwin Liu, Associate Justice of the California Supreme Court; and Bill Neukom, President & CEO of The World Justice Project and former general counsel of Microsoft;
  • Legal Aid – Ira Belkin, Ford Foundation Program Officer stationed in Beijing working on law and rights issues, and former federal prosecutor; and Ben Liebman, Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and Director of the Center for Chinese Legal Studies.
  • Counterterrorism & Human Rights – Julie Fernandes, Director of the Alliance to End Slavery & Trafficking and former deputy assistant attorney general for the Civil Rights Division at the U.S. Department of Justice; and Sarah Cleveland, Professor in Human and Constitutional Rights and Columbia Law School and Faculty Co-Director of the Human Rights Institute.

While in Beijing, the delegation had a dinner meeting with Gary Locke, US Ambassador to China, and visited the Sunshine Halfway House of Chaoyang District.

Since his return, John has had follow-up communications with Mr. Sujun Zhang, Vice Minister in the Ministry of Justice, and Ms. Xie Yuni, Deputy Director-General of the Department of Community Corrections. We are replying to Mr. Sujun’s inquiry about our ability to train some PRC corrections officials in evidence-based research and evidence-based practice in community corrections and prison/jail management.


‘What Matters’ & Certification Training

Faculty from the University of Cincinnati will sponsor an all day training workshop on Sept. 9, as a preconference event in Orlando. The workshop will focus on some of the many manualized, evidence-based curricula that have greatly added to the delivery of services to offenders.

Integrating Core Correctional Practices into Group Facilitation

Faculty from the University of Cincinnati will sponsor an all day training workshop on Sept. 9, as a preconference event in Orlando. The workshop will focus on some of the many manualized, evidence-based curricula that have greatly added to the delivery of services to offenders. It will consider what happens when offenders fail to follow their lines in the script. What are the ways to stimulate positive responses and get back on track? This session will discuss the core correctional practices of relationship skills, effective disapproval, effective reinforcement, and effective authority as strategies to manage offender groups. The session will describe strategies that can be proactive in gaining compliance, including a behavior management system to assist in retention and engagement.

In addition to plenary speakers, conference tracks cover “What Matters” in the following areas:

  • Offender Supervision
  • Community Supervision of Women Offenders
  • Restorative Justice
  • Leadership in Community Corrections
  • Reducing Barriers to Effectiveness

Denise Robinson

Denise Robinson’s tenure as President and CEO of Alvis House has been marked by her professionalism, hard work, determination and dedication to the organization’s mission of assisting at-risk children and adults with a wide variety of programs devoted to enhancing quality of life. Her traits as a leader are all reasons why she has received numerous awards and recognition.

Denise Robinson’s tenure as President and CEO of Alvis House has been marked by her professionalism, hard work, determination and dedication to the organization’s mission of assisting at-risk children and adults with a wide variety of programs devoted to enhancing quality of life. Her traits as a leader are all reasons why she has received numerous awards and recognition.

Robinson is a strategic thinker who sets measurable objectives required to advance the quality and success of the agency’s programs and services. She has an uncanny ability to see emerging trends and view the big picture surrounding a particular challenge. Much of what Alvis House has achieved is a direct result of Robinson’s vision and ability to assemble key people, bringing out their best attributes in the process.

She is quick to give credit and has imbued the agency with a strong emphasis on professionalism, quality assurance, research-based programming and staff development. Robinson is a leader who works hard to help others– staff, clients, and colleagues– to succeed.

Robinson’s impact is evident in some of the agency’s recent achievements. In 2008, she spearheaded the process to develop a new strategic plan, intended to take the agency through 2012. The plan envisioned continued growth into services for individuals with developmental disabilities, and providing more services to at-risk individuals and families while still maintaining and seeking growth in Alvis House’s core business of corrections and re-entry programs.

When the plan was developed, Alvis House had seven executive staff members, 25 managers, and 200 total staff, operating at 15 locations.

For more information on Alvis House, visit www.alvis180.org/