About Community Corrections

The supervision of returning citizens and provision of supportive services to these individuals outside of jail or prison. Community corrections includes parole, probation, residential and employment services, and other support programs. Learn more…

Latest News

Federal Funds Available for PREA Implementation from Impact Justice

Impact Justice is excited to announce that the PREA Targeted Implementation Planning and Support (PREA TIPS) program application is now open.

PREA TIPS is a new opportunity from Impact Justice, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, to provide federal funding* in the amount of $20,000 – $200,000 to assist in PREA implementation. This opportunity is open to small and medium locally operated jails, juvenile facilities, community confinement facilities, lockups, and tribal facilities with fewer than 500 beds, with a preference for facilities with fewer than 200 beds. Agencies and facilities are also welcome to submit joint applications.

Agencies and facilities will receive strategic guidance from subject matter experts at Impact Justice, the PREA Resource Center, Vera Institute of Justice, and the Center for Children’s Law and Policy during a planning phase before entering into an up to 18-month phase to implement their plan. Each successful applicant will be assigned a PREA expert to work with throughout the program period.

Applications are due August 30, 2019.

 

Apply for this Grant

 

Job Opening: Chief Adult Probation Officer (Arizona)

The Judicial Branch of Arizona in Maricopa County is seeking a Chief Adult Probation Officer who is a proactive, innovative leader and collaborative manager with well-rounded experience in the adult justice system. The Maricopa County Adult Probation Department is an essential component of a larger legal system with legal responsibilities prescribed by the Superior Court. The Chief Adult Probation Officer is expected to maintain a high level of commitment to community safety and furthering the court’s ability to achieve its mission and objectives effectively and efficiently. Recruitment is open until filled.

 

See Complete Job Description

 

Federal Funds Available for PREA Implementation from Impact Justice

Impact Justice is excited to announce that the PREA Targeted Implementation Planning and Support (PREA TIPS) program application is now open.

PREA TIPS is a new opportunity from Impact Justice, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, to provide federal funding* in the amount of $20,000 – $200,000 to assist in PREA implementation. This opportunity is open to small and medium locally operated jails, juvenile facilities, community confinement facilities, lockups, and tribal facilities with fewer than 500 beds, with a preference for facilities with fewer than 200 beds. Agencies and facilities are also welcome to submit joint applications.

Agencies and facilities will receive strategic guidance from subject matter experts at Impact Justice, the PREA Resource Center, Vera Institute of Justice, and the Center for Children’s Law and Policy during a planning phase before entering into an up to 18-month phase to implement their plan. Each successful applicant will be assigned a PREA expert to work with throughout the program period.

Applications are due August 30, 2019 at 11:59 pm EST.

 

Apply for this Funding Opportunity

 

Award Nominations Are Open!

ICCA is accepting nominations for its annual awards. We encourage you to submit your nominations to recognize your contemporaries who lead our organization and the field of community corrections. There are six awards open for nominations:

  • Emerging Leader Award for significant contributions to the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA) and/or to the community corrections profession and has demonstrated the potential for leadership and continuing service.
  • Margaret Mead Award for leadership in the field of community corrections through guidance, innovative ideas, influence of policy and/or dedicated service to the ideals and goals of community-based correctional programming.
  • Arthur McDonald Leadership and Service Award for demonstrated commitment to community-based corrections and who utilize the Association as a vehicle to support their goals.
  • David Dillingham Award for a career public service professional who quietly provides leadership, direction and steady influence in moving his or her public agency towards evidenced-based practices.
  • Judicial Award, and the
  • J.Bryan Riley Meritorious Service Award recognizing an individual whose work exemplifies the ideals of ICCA and who have delivered outstanding service to community corrections.

 

Nominations are due by COB on July 26, 2019.

 

Submit a Nomination Form.

 

ICCA is Hosting a Leadership Workshop on Sept. 15 in Arlington, VA

The ICCA is excited to offer a unique and exciting two-part pre-conference workshop focused on the future of leadership in the field of community corrections and reentry services. This workshop will be held on Sunday, September 15 at the Hyatt Regency in Arlington, VA, prior to the start of the Forum on Criminal Justice.

The first session, Leadership Development, is forward looking with a goal of offering current and emerging leaders a framework through which to understand and differentiate technical problems to be solved in their organizations and communities versus the larger adaptive challenges that cannot be solved by individual leaders alone and therefore require a larger rethinking and reimagining of purpose and priorities.

The second session, Learning from Leaders, will feature a dynamic and interactive panel of four leaders who have been active in both responding to and shaping the trajectory of the field of community corrections and reentry services over the past three decades or more. The session will spotlight each leader’s career accomplishments, developmental experiences, mistakes and regrets, and thoughts on the current and future state of the field. Specifically, this facilitated session will feature three mini-sessions. The first will highlight each leader individually. The second will feature the leaders in dialogue and discussion with one another while the third will engage participants in a larger conversation with workshop attendees to include a revisiting and application of the leadership frameworks introduce in Session I.

Presenting for the workshop are: Brad Rogue, founder and president of Justice Systems Assessment and Training (JSAT), and Steven Woolworth, Vice President of Behavioral Health & Transition Services at Pioneer Human Services.

Individual registration is $125 per session or $200 to attend both sessions. Click the link below to learn more about the workshop and to register to attend.

 

Register to attend the workshop.

 

ICCA Ontario Summer Newsletter

On behalf of Bev Voisin and Heather Kerr, Co-Chairs of the ICCA Ontario Chapter:

The International Community Corrections Association – Ontario Chapter is pleased to share the summer edition of our newsletter (attached). We hope you enjoy the conference highlights as well as a snapshot of our 2019-2022 Strategic Plan that will shape our future work with corrections in Ontario.

Please share the attached information widely and mark your calendars for the 3rd Annual Training Conference happening in Kitchener/Waterloo in May 2020. More details will follow.

If you have any questions or would like more information on becoming a member of the ICCA Ontario Chapter, please reach out. We’d be happy to speak with you!

Read the Summer Newsletter.

 

 

Join Us for the 2019 Forum on Criminal Justice, Sept 15 – 18 in Arlington, VA!

Sponsored by the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA) and the National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA), the 2019 Forum on Criminal Justice will showcase programs, research and policies that will help justice practitioners, researchers and decision makers address pressing public safety issues. This new partnership between ICCA and NCJA reflects the understanding that only by bringing together various sectors of the justice system can real progress be made.

The 2019 Forum will be held September 15-18 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia. Workshops will feature promising and innovative programs and strategies to address crime around the country; examine new research and evaluation around priority issues and highlight available resources within the Department of Justice.

Conference information available here.

 

 

Dear RRC Providers and ICCA Board,

Last week the Senate Appropriations Committee passed its version of the FY19 Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies (CJS) appropriations bill. Once reconciled with the version moving through the House, this will be the bill that funds the Department of Justice and its functions for Fiscal Year 2019. The committee issues a report that accompanies the bill, which offers more detail and explanation than the bill text and expresses the Senate appropriators’ informal instructions to the Department. The committee report includes the following language. This is similar to last year’s language and is in response to the changes BOP was making to RRC contracts and to the Statement of Work.

We are grateful to Senators for continuing to support RRCs in this way.

Residential Reentry Centers.-The Committee maintains concerns and expectations regarding Residential Reentry Centers [RRCs] as outlined in Senate Report 115-139 and codified in Public Law 115- 141, including the direction requiring BOP to alert the Committee before adopting any significant change in policy or practice involving RRCs or other recidivism-reduction measures. The Committee directs BOP not to cancel or modify any existing contracts for RRCs if another BOP-contracted RRC facility does not exist within 100 miles of the existing RRC. In instances where RRC contracts are expiring, the Committee directs BOP to take interim and emergency measures to prevent facility closures and the interruption of services, including by expediting solicitations and re-solicitations for existing services.

Please continue your dialog with both Senators and Representatives and keep us apprised.

Thank you,

ICCA

 

 

Regarding Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) Contracts

 

May 2018ICCA-logo

Dear Colleagues,
Around this time last year, under the auspices of the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA) we came together to discuss issues we were experiencing with our BOP contracts. Since that time, we have seen the appointment and sudden resignation of BOP Director Mark Inch and participated in several discussions with him and key BOP leadership. Additionally, we closely followed then-Director Inch’s Congressional testimony and kept a keen eye on legislation moving through Congress.

I am writing to share what we have learned, to ask for an update on what you are experiencing and suggest steps we can take together going forward.

Read Full Letter Here

 

 

Improving Public Safety Through Effective Community Reintegration Practices

NIC and CCCN are creating a DVD based training program designed to highlight effective community reintegration practices that will promote behavior change and recidivism reduction, enhance public safety, and save taxpayer dollars.

Description
The United States criminal justice system manages a staggering 7 million adults and three quarter of a million juveniles – the majority of which will be returning to our communities. Justice professionals need to take a system-wide, evidence-based approach and work collaboratively if we want to improve public safety and increase the likelihood of success for those reintegrating back into our communities. The collateral consequences for someone involved in the justice system can be severe. For adults, these can include having a harder time finding a job, difficulty finding safe and sustainable housing, and interruptions in family dynamics and relationships. Juveniles can experience difficulties getting back on track with school and maintaining positive peer relationships. And while some of these consequences are unique to adult or juvenile populations, one consequence stands out as damaging for both: the difficulty of successfully reintegrating and connecting back to the community.

Find Out More